[Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD


10 thoughts on “[Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD

  1. says: [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters

    [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD 2 upper middle class pseudo left wing and bullshit stars Ms Atwood has written some of my favorite books namely Alias Grace and Oryx and Crake She is very talented in some of her fiction but she really missed the mark unless you are part of the well heeled but not too well heeled bureaucrats academics and prof

  2. says: free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters

    [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters The God of Cosmic DebtPayback is a literary anthropology not of the concept or practice of debt but of the relationship between debto

  3. says: [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters free read Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture

    free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters This book has been billed as a look at the literary side of debt but it is much than that It does indeed look at h

  4. says: [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD

    [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Original review date 10 August 2013The whole world is swimming in debt and by that I don't just mean a lot of us are up to our eyeballs in overdue bills I mean that the concept of debt of being in hock of owing something to someone of carrying a balance that will soon come due is a construct that permeates our social environment and

  5. says: [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD

    [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD This book is titled Payback and the Shadow Side of Wealth It does deal with financial debt but also the larger concept of dept balance and fairness Margaret Atwood is enjoyable smart and witty I enjoyed this book There were many memorable uotes A put a couple of my favorites so I can find them laterThe trickle down theory of economics has it that it's good for rich people to get even richer because some of th

  6. says: Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood free read Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture

    free read Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters As President Obama signs the 800 billion dollar stimulus package today and our national debt balloons to a 53 year high of 10 trillion dollars lots of us have debt on our minds Most of us are simply focusing on how to pay our credit card bills but Margaret Atwood takes on debt from evolutionary spiritual and literary standpointsShe starts the book by explaining how reciprocity is the underlying structure of most human and primat

  7. says: [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD

    free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters Note This Review was written in 2010 – but Atwood’s writing is even relevant now when you consider the rise of the Occupy movement and the near revolutionary activity in Greece Spain and PortugalI like to imagine that baby Margaret Atwood’s first word was not “Mama” or “Dada” but “Why?” When novelist Atwood focuses her curiosity on our personal and societal relationship with debt she shifts the discussion into

  8. says: free read Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood

    free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD This book could hardly be timely nor from the hand of a better writer No this is not fiction at least not for the most part but a study of debt

  9. says: [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood free read Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture

    [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood is the kind of writer who makes me want to read not just of her own writing though certainly I intend to eventually read all she's written but she also makes me want to read everything there is out there Her breadth of knowledge and acuaintance with other texts is always astounding In addition to writing incredible books I'll never forget her wonderful sense of humour and fascinating talks living in Edinb

  10. says: [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters free read ñ eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB ó Margaret Atwood

    [Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture] EBOOK DOWNLOAD Margaret Atwood ó 7 characters free read Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture This is a brilliant book from Margaret Atwood who is my favourite poet despite her being better known as a novelist This book however is neither poetry nor fiction but a considered thought provoking and enlightening look at

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It misses the real significance of her observation about the importance of debt in English fictionChristianity following the lead of Judaism and in parallel in English fictionChristianity following the lead of Judaism and in parallel Islam has consistently condemned usury the lending of money at any interest at all from the time of the 2nd and 3rd C Church Fathers and the early Councils The last explicit prohibition was contained in the encyclical Vix Prevenit of 1745 to the Italian bishops and generalised to the entire Catholic Church by Pope Gregory XVI in 1836 Since that date there has been well utter silence on the subject by the Church no encyclical no apostolic exhortation No Informal Greetings To Either informal greetings to either or retract the ancient ecclesial displeasure with any form of debt And this at the same epochal moment that the debt crisis of the Industrial Revolution was reaching its literary peakIt is of course tempting to attribute this silence to a pragmatic acceptance by the Church of a fait accompli that had become a central aspect of modern society But the Catholic Church hasn t been known for its cultural sensibilities in other areas like politics and sex Or it could have occurred to Church policy makers that the various technical subterfuges the so called three contract solution for example which converted debt into an interest free loan with insurance premiums attached or which treated money as land that could be rented through payment up front or the various greening ploys of Islamic finance made the matter a legal maze that they didn t want to get lost in But of course the Catholic Church has rarely demurred from simplifying other complex situations like marriage or sacramental access into unshakeable canon law And the fact that a significant portion of the 19th C world at least those who spoke and read English had adopted an increasingly negative view of creditors credit law penalties connected with that law and the social impact of debt was encouraging a stand by the Church that was a pillar of its tradition Why then did the Church decline as it were the invitation to engage the world on its own turfI offer a suggestion the only evidence for which is the abrupt but apparently permanent silence of the Church on the matter The reason could well be a logical one involving the recognition that the profoundest and most central doctrine of the Church the Atonement by Christ for the sin as well as sins of the world is in fact undermined by the arguments traditionally presented against debt These arguments imply that God the Father is a usurer that his calculation of the debt owed by creation to himself as the Creator is of a magnitude which cannot be paid back by his creatures In fact according to the doctrine first formulated by St Anselm in the 11th C developed by Auinas in the 13thC and taught by the Church since this debt is an infinite imbalance in the moral universe that is the debt is far greater than the credit created in the material universe Therefore only the sacrifice of an infinite being Christ can compensate or atone for this imbalance between debits and credits The formulation from the 1928 encyclical Miserentissimus Redemptor reads as follows The creature s love should be given in return for the love of the Creator another thing follows from this at once namely that to the same uncreated Love if so be it has been neglected by forgetfulness or violated by offense some sort of compensation must be rendered for the injury and this debt is commonly called by the name of reparationIt is this Substitution Theory of Atonement as opposed to the previous prevailing Ransom Theory in which it is Satan who is paid to leave the world alone that is directly attacked by the various medieval theories against lending at interest Despite their disparate technicalities and arcane logics all these theories are grounded in exactly the issue that Atwood identifies not debt per se but the relationship created between debtor and creditor This is a relation of power not simply obligation Obligation is a moral force which free will another central Christian doctrine may choose to respond to or not Power on the other hand is a material relationship of subjugation which by definition limits free will and implies coercion Payback revenge for failure to repay the debt according to the rules is the purpose of Hell Theories of usury were therefore implicit udgements of God the Father as usurious as coercive in his demands of his creation It might be noted that in church time Anselm s doctrine is relatively recent it takes centuries for dogmatic formulation to take place in the Catholic Church The politics involved are at least as intense as in any other large organisation Vix Prevenit and its 19thC re statement might well be the last gasps of a faction intent on preserving the myth of un changeability in Catholic doctrine if nothing else Is it only coincidence that literature liberal politically independent literature blossomed in a leading democratic society like Britain to adopt the stand historically taken by a now passive Church And is it also possible that good theological reason for that passivity were being recognised even if only intuitively by the denizens of the Church curia Finally is it possible that Atwood has been so acculturated into the Atonement Theory of Anselm that she has applied it unwittingly to her ecological conclusion about Nature s impending revenge Who knows but I wish there were time in my life for another doctoral thesis. T the idea of what we owe may well be built into the human imagination as one of its most dynamic metaphors Her final lecture addresses the notion of a debt to nature and the need to find new ways of interacting with the natural world before it is too la. .
This is a brilliant book from Margaret Atwood who is my favourite poet despite her being better known as a novelist This book however is neither poetry nor fiction but a considered thought provoking and enlightening look at debt It looks at the idea of debt and how it has informed politics the ustice system and literature through history Atwood looks at word origins and the origins of debt awareness showing that other primates are aware of debt She also looks at how potent a theme debt has been in literature She makes an interesting point about George Eliot s Mill on the Floss representing a moment of social change a moment where the miller historically mistrusted for reasons discussed by Atwood becomes ursurped in this position by the lawyerThe last chapter in the book looks at the issue of Ecological Debt and sees Dicken s character of Scrooge facing the Spirits of Earth Day Past Present and Future Thi This book could hardly be timely nor from the hand of a better writer No this is not fiction at least not for the most part but a study of debt Margaret Atwood begins her book by considering the idea of fairness upon which so much loaning and paying back are based She then considers the connection between debt and sin pointing out among other things the variance in the Lord s Prayer between forgive us our debts and forgive us our trespasses Atwood goes on to argue that debt is at the heart of much fiction particularly that of the nineteenth century Central to this section is a fascinating reading of Dickens Scrooge a reading that will reverberate with the final section of her book The last two chapters deal with the Shadow Side of debt that is the dark results from incurring a debt one cannot pay back and the ultimate Payback which is what we all might reap for extracting wealth from the earth borrowing from the earth we might say without ever really imagining that the time to pay back our debt would arrive as surely as did the time for Doctor Faustus relinuish his soul to the devil This entire book is a very interesting and informative read and the last chapter which contains a biting rewrite of the Scrooge story with a Wall Street executive as the Nouveau Scrooge is a must One final comment It is always thrilling as a lover of literature to see someone use literature so effectively while making an argument that deals with the world of reality in this case politics and economics Atwood does this about as well as it can be done As President Obama signs the 800 billion dollar stimulus package today and our national debt balloons to a 53 year high of 10 trillion dollars lots of us have debt on our minds Most of us are simply focusing on how to pay our credit card bills but Margaret Atwood takes on debt from evolutionary spiritual and literary standpointsShe starts the book by explaining how reciprocity is the underlying structure of most human and primate relations We are willing to give and share as long as we know that personprimate will give and share with us in the future She cites a study in which monkeys were trained to trade pebbles for cucumber slices Then the scientists gave some monkeys grapes a far better reward than a cucumber The other monkeys got upset and eventually refused to participate in the trading Basically they went on strike demanding eual pay for eual work In The Wild Chimps the wild chimps cooperate based on mutually beneficial trading or reciprocal altruism Chimp A will help Chimp B gang up on Chimp C but "later on chimp b doesn t help chimp "on Chimp B doesn help Chimp Chimp A will get very angry and throw a tantrum In humans reciprocal altruism is important not only to emotion but also to cognition People were far better at solving problems when the problems were framed as cheater detection problems We think through problems easily when we are seeking out fairnessFrom these studies it is apparent that society and relationships function best when we balance out debt towards each other We are programmed to not let others take advantage of us We will give as long as we know we will receive something back in the end Even in parentchild relationships potentially the most debt ridden ones parents expect or hope to receive love in return for the care they provide Atwood spends a good portion of the book giving examples from Faust to Dickens of people selling their souls to the devil the most extreme form of debt And you thought it was hard to get out of paying those late feesThank you Lilliam for your recommendation and lending me the book I promise to reciprocate in the near future Original review date 10 August 2013The whole world is swimming in debt and by that I don t ust mean a lot of us are up to our eyeballs in overdue bills I mean that the concept of debt of being in hock of owing something to someone of carrying a balance that will soon come due is a construct that permeates our social environment and has done so throughout recorded history The idea of debt is central not only to our financial lives but to our relationships with others the metaphors we use and the stories we tell and it can even be viewed as the primary theme of the Christian religionBut what is debt And why is it so important to the human conditionAtwood is my favorite novelist because her incisive prose cuts so deeply and directly to the unspoken heart of any matter This is the first nonfiction of hers that I ve read and I loved it for the same reason I didn t know I had the capacity to fall so very hard. Collected here the Massey Lectures from legendary novelist Margaret Atwood investigate the highly topical subject of debt She doesn’t talk about high finance or managing money; instead she goes far deeper to explore debt as an ancient and central motif. ,


free read Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture

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Payback Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth CBC Massey Lecture
In love with a nonfictional treatiseTypically my opinion of non narrative nonfiction varies along a single axis from interesting to boring Sure there s some room a single axis from interesting to boring Sure there s some room impress me with style but that s about it This book is on a completely different plane I know that there is literary nonfiction out there and I need to start finding it Trendy Daily Show intellectuals and their workmanlike disuisitions Dreaming Me: An African-American Woman's Buddhist Journey just aren t going to cut it for me any sorry Nate Silver et alIn Payback Atwood looks at the philosophical psychological religious and literary underpinnings of debt searching for a deeper understanding of what it is and why it matters so much to us After noting thatustice and fairness are concepts observed not God's Pocket just in all human societies but also in monkey and ape behavior she surmises that there must be something innate within us that latches on to this idea It s part of the basic human smorgasbord of conceptsust as building a web is part of a spider s and licking her own butthole is part of my cat sAnd indeed debt is a very old notion Hammurabi s Code introduced the eye for an eye option for settling accounts In ancient Egypt your soul s moral credits and debits had better have evened out by the time you died or else your heart would get thrown to the alligators And ancient Greece and Rome gave us blind Justice balancing the scales to ensure everyone gets what they are owedThe book s most interesting chapters however deal with Christianity Because as Atwood deftly points out the basic story of Christianity is a story about debt God creates Man who then owes the Almighty obedience and worship in return But with original sin Man defaults on this obligation and plunges himself even further into spiritual debt It s such a massive imbalance that Man cannot hope to repay it and get his soul back into the black especially since he keeps sinning and digging himself in deeper but then Jesus comes around to redeem him in both senses of that word The debt is forgiven and Man avoids the debtor s prison that is HellIt s as if our souls are all being held in hock in a mystical pawnshop of the soul where the broker is the devil and only Jesus can spot you the cash you need to get your shit back When you die you ve either accepted the son of God s largesse or whoops time s up Satan gets to keep youThis way of framing Christianity is utterly fascinating to me It takes this archetype that we associate with finances capitalism and worldly concerns and shows how both it and our most holy testaments are cut from exactly the same cloth There are only a few basic archetypes in human symbology and the idea of debt is clearly a cardinal oneAtwood goes on to examine debt in literature whether financial Ebenezer Scrooge s miserliness spiritual Dr Faustus and others who sell their soul to the devil or soaked in blood the Merchant of Venice s pound of flesh Hamlet s obligation of vengeanceFinally she looks at the debt we owe to the natural world we have been drawing on Nature s resources for far too long and the balance is coming dueOverall this book is a fascinating examination of a concept I "d previously taken for granted It s insightful smart funny and "previously taken for granted It s insightful smart funny and readable It won t tell you how to get yourself out of debt but it will give you some insight into why your debt even matters philosophically speaking I can t praise this book enough Atwood is my hero The God of Cosmic DebtPayback is a literary anthropology not of the concept or practice of debt but of the relationship between debtor and creditor from ancient Greece to modern Europe and North America Conseuently it will have little interest to economists or lawyers or ethicists to the extent that any of these is looking for evidence or exposition of a theory of debt The facts Atwood presents are
Attitudes And Judgements Found Almost 
and udgements found almost in fictional writing On the face of it the book has little relevance to either governmental policy or personal finance Atwood s rather disconnected final chapter simply states her view unsupported by any other material in the book that modern industrial consumer society has created a worsening ecological debt which is owed to Nature and for which Nature is about to seek payback that is punitive retribution for the failure to honour the purported terms of this debt Her literary exegesis is interesting and stimulating Her ecological conclusions are pedestrian and boringOne of her literary observations I find particularly interesting however the driving force of mid 19th C English literature she cites George Eliot Dickens and Thackeray primarily is debt particularly its corrupting effect on the institutions of society This is obvious once stated but having been stated it is an insight that changes one s outlook profoundly Eliot s The Mill on the Floss for example becomes not a tale of familial love and loyalty lost and found but one of debts perceived and disputed in a search for an euilibrium between debits and credits The only winner is Lawyer Wakem who survives with a mere beating Everyone else dies And of course death wipes the slate clean in the manner of an unpaid bar tabAtwood recognises the connection between religious belief and attitudes toward debt But she doesn t develop that connection nearly far enough For example she somewhat facilely comments on the Protestant Reformation as breaking the traditional Christian taboo on lending at interest This is misleading at best More significantly. In religion literature and the structure of human societies By looking at how debt has informed our thinking from preliterate times to the present day from the stories we tell of revenge and sin to the way we order social relationships Atwood argues tha.